In a While, Crocodile

In a While, Crocodile

Walking down Wellington Street rests a very chill crocodile, sitting on an inner tube in a blue pool, wearing sunglasses and holding a blue bottle. With clouds in the sky, Steven Twigg’s traditional style of background consists of vibrant blues, yellows, reds, and greens that begin behind the crocodile and can be seen to wrap around the Bell Box. 

Wild Water’s Edge

Wild Water’s Edge

Completed: July 2023 I am inspired by the trails, conservation areas and proximity to the Credit River that Halton Hills residents enjoy. These spaces provide spectacular experiences for its human population and contribute essential habitat for native wetland flora, fauna and migratory species. Titled Wild Water’s Edge, my Bell Box mural design is meant to echo…

Little One’s City

Little One’s City

The Mural is a reflection of vibrants streets, showcasing colourful roads and buildings in-front of a cloud filled sky. The vibrant streets and buildings aim to inspire the youth to create more art and build community. This design also reinforces diversity and interconnectedness; through which a community thrives. The colourful buildings within this city landscape speak to those who dwell within and bring the streets to life. As I painted amongst the community, a little boy and his father were driving past as the child exclaimed that he wanted to visit the city landscape. This inspired me to title the mural “Little One’s City” as it is the youth that are our future.

Mother Nature & Friends

Mother Nature & Friends

“This mural is inspired by Toronto, Canada and Mother Nature. On the front there is a mountain in the shape of Mother Nature’s face, she is smiling and resting peacefully with flowers and trees all over her. Her hair wraps to the right side, transforming into a flow of lines, swirls and more flowers. Toronto’s famous white squirrel is there as well. She is munching on an acorn and being as cute as she always is. Summer scenario on the front is changing into Autumn, as the mural wraps to the left. There are maple and oak leafs flying through the sky. It moves into a night, where floral design frames a special guest, Racoonie. He is startled to be caught playing with a little yellow duckie, a reference to the World’s largest rubber duck’s appearance in Toronto, 2017. This is a little tribute to it, since it wasn’t able to return to Toronto this year.”

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Vicky Bilbily’s ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Bell Box displays the glass-covered interior of a robot’s brain and forehead, presumably asleep. The robot’s large eyes are open, looking to the left of the viewer, but their brain – a light blue semicircle circle – is filled with ten sheep connected to each other with a dark blue lines. The robot’s brain is connected to their body with light blue lines, reminiscent of a circuit board.

Cyclist

Cyclist

Ghazaleh Rastgar’s ‘Cyclist’ Bell Box depicts a painted side-view of a figure with long black hair, yellow pattern pants and a red shirt cycling on a sunny day. The sun’s dotted rays shine on the cyclist, as well as two bushes that they cycle past.

Chickadee

Chickadee

Robyn Lightwalker’s ‘Chickadee’ Bell Box displays the fun and liveliness of the chickadee, a bird local to this Bell Box’s location. This Box features a chickadee sitting atop a branch, which covers a neon pink expanding flower. The Bell Box’s background, dark blue with neon green dots, creates an exciting atmosphere for this hedge-backed area. 

Salmon Run

Salmon Run

‘Salmon Run’ is a Bell Box located in Sunnylea Park in Etobicoke. Depicting nineteen abstractly-painted salmon that swim toward the top of the Box, the artist captures the annual ‘salmon run,’ where between September to November, adult salmon swim from the ocean to freshwater, against currents and ‘climb’ upstream to begin the salmon lifecycle again.

Flora & Fauna

Flora & Fauna

This is my most recent community/public mural. I was happy to participate in the @bellboxmurals program in Etobicoke. My theme was local flora and fauna. It was a joy to create. I finished at a tough lighting time of day with this speckled light through the trees but since I don’t know when I’ll be back in Etobicoke these are the best pics I have for now. Pastels for life.

Bayside Lane Bell Box

Bayside Lane Bell Box

Up in the bright blue sky, gliding carefree with the warm wind, there they are! Mysterious jellyfish and colourful butterflies, seahorses and stars, elegant frigates sailing the marshmallow clouds, kites shaped like diamonds and other ones arched like the bird wing… Where do they come from, and where are they going to?

Forever and Always

Forever and Always

‘Forever and Always’ is located in the front boulevard before the parking lot of St. Mark’s Catholic church. It depicts two cardinals, one on either side of the Bell Box, sitting among light blue forget-me-nots that dot the entire background of the work. The Box’s lower left side bears the artist’s dedication: ‘Dedicated to my…

The Hills are Alive

The Hills are Alive

‘The Hills are Alive’ Bell Box mural displays five turtles lounging in the water, looking to the sky as the sunset paints it pink, orange and purple behind them. Made most clear on the Bell Box’s front face, these turtles appear to be supporting forests on their backs.
From the artist: “A lot of my painting is inspired by finding parallels in nature. Themes that echo throughout my work are often camouflage, illusion, trickery and survival and finding ways of communicating the bonds that many living organisms share in our natural world.”

Grimsby Grown

Grimsby Grown

This Bell Box recalls fruit crates from roadside fruit stands in Grimsby and those that travel to grocery stores throughout Ontario delivering Grimsby fresh produce. It celebrates the history and culture of fruit farming, farming technology and agricultural research that has been such a part of the region for generations and is still alive today.

Spring Cardinals

Spring Cardinals

‘Spring Cardinals’ depicts three adult northern cardinals, two sitting and one alighting on a pear branch, their bright colours contrasting against a bright blue sky. Pear tree branches span across the surfaces of the box, wrapping and visually connecting all sides. On the branch, flowers are budding while others are bursting forth. Leaves are painted in the bright green of early spring and are in various stages of unfurling in the sunny air.

Stephen Drive Bell Box

Stephen Drive Bell Box

This Bell Box depicts a wrap-around waterside scene. The front face of the Box displays a seagull atop a wooden post, which separates a sailboat at sea during the daytime and a windsurfer catching some orange sunset currents. Round the back, the orange moves to a violet sunset, which, separated by an ornate lamppost, gives way to a scene of a lighthouse overlooking the water. Two sailboats are docked in front of the lighthouse. Returning to the front of the box, two floating sailboats are visible.

421 Markham Road Bell Box

421 Markham Road Bell Box

This pink-background Bell Box features geometric and abstract shapes to liven up the boulevard of 421 Markham. This design expands across the unique double-Bell Box configuration at this intersection, featuring one large Bell Box immediately next to a smaller, rectangular signal box-size structure. Rubik’s cubes, mono-colour 3-D shapes and abstract shapes fly over green triangles and blue streaks, which give the appearance of a geometric forest resting on the bottom of both structures that make up this Bell Box.

Sound of Water

Sound of Water

This mural advocates for wildlife and water conservation by reintegrating the water, its inhabitants and local plant specimens back into the city allowing community members to reconnect with nature, water and the land they live on.

Canoe Garden with Wildlife

Canoe Garden with Wildlife

I created this mural as a means of bringing attention to the local gardening efforts to bring green spaces into the city. This work highlights the possibility that these efforts will bring wildlife back into urban areas and for us to appreciate the space that we share with nature. This idyllic scene shows a recycled canoe transformed into a garden with plants and animals from Ontario around it.