Ohkoi’sski

Ohkoi’sski

The mural has two separate but connected pieces.

First, the mural on the wall depicts eagle feathers, animal tracks, and the confluence of the Elbow and Bow Rivers. Both artists felt the symbolism in the mural mattered most.

The eagle feather is the feather of a golden eagle that has lost its spots and is now an adult eagle.

Mosaic Sea: Hope

Mosaic Sea: Hope

This mural is located on the RaY building (Resource Assistance for Youth). It is a fragment of what was a larger mural located in front the pedestrian walkway at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, during the construction of the Inuit Art Centre Qaumajuq. The larger mural was displayed until Qaumajuq’s opening in 2021.

RaY Inc. x Art City

RaY Inc. x Art City

This mural was painted by participants from RaY inc. (Resource Assistance for Youth), a nonprofit organization that supports youth in Winnipeg. The project was led by Jessica Canard. It depicts four figures smudging in a field, representing the diversity of Winnipeg’s West Broadway community. To the left is a map of the city, with its two main rivers prominently visible; the Red River and the Assiniboine. This is a reminder of the importance of our rivers, and their role as the original trade routes of Turtle Island.

Welcome to Canada

Welcome to Canada

This mural, depicting a black-indigenous woman, addresses Canada’s history of erasure Black & Indigenous stories and culture. The woman is seen smoking a cigarette in front of a natural landscape with birds above her head. She wears a garment with details of maple leaves on it. The yellow circles inside white squares is a symbol that was created by the artist and represents unity, but also the feeling of being stuck, spinning, and being controlled and blind.

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This mural was designed for Parks Canada to raise awareness for the White Bark Pine Tree- an endangered species in the National Parks. after a National Artist call out that Parks Canada I was so honoured to be chosen to design and paint this mural

Bones of our Past

Bones of our Past

This is a piece that speaks towards the history of the residential school system and powerfully depicts the survival and strength of Indigenous people, even through historical violence. Kalum paints a girl in traditional regalia with her buffalo skull staff, ravens fly around her ushering her forward. This mural sits high above Mohkinstsis, on High Park and should serve as a reminder of what it really means for all of us to exist on this land, and how much more work there needs to be done for true reconciliation. At BUMP we hope to continue programming incredible Indigenous muralists whose public art shifts our perspectives in real time, whose transformation of public spaces around the city is necessary and profound.

Nakoshiw – Emerge

Nakoshiw – Emerge

This piece was created to reflect the emergence of a new generation of Métis and Métis artists reconnecting with their culture, homelands, medicines, and Kin. Riel is often referenced and quoted when it comes to the emergence and depiction of our people. In this mural I wanted to reference my Cousin Valarie Campbell as a young matriarch.

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Exploring the shared iconographic relationships and cultural usage of Buffalo, Deer and Elk hide in First Nation cultural storytelling in addition to the Romanticised ‘Western’ Aesthetic of North America.

Buffalo Nations Stand and Be Noticed

Buffalo Nations Stand and Be Noticed

The Buffalo with the Camp and simple landscape represents all the Buffalo Nations that hunted and lived off the Buffalo. The dragonflies represents the month
of August and also I wanted to tie the Beltline mural project with it…. during August and late July the dragonflies are in full effect and is good to help time the
changes in the seasons. Under them are traditional otter designs which are common design in Treaty7 territory. The riders are youth and elder riding together
representing parenting, mentoring, and the balance.

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Mural by Peatr Thomas (@thunderbird4311) for the 2023 KJ BIT Laneway jam, with the theme “GLOW.” Supported by Canada Council for the Arts and the Toronto Arts Council.

Water is Life

Water is Life

The project, an initiative inspired by Murdoch and acclaimed artist and activist Christi Belcourt, was designed to help the two artists get their message out to the public. That message, noted Murdoch “is simply to create awareness that water is important to us all and as such we are encouraging every Canadian to stand up and do something positive for the environment. If we can find the strength and resolve to work together for the betterment of the planet, then we have taken a step forward in helping to ensure that humankind will be able to survive well into the future. You cannot overstate the importance of a healthy environment and that begins by protecting our water. To emphasize that importance, we became involved in creating two murals on the same weekend, one in Edmonton and the other in Ottawa.

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Large scale mural dedicated to missing, murdered & Indigenous people of Turtle Island by local artist Que Rock. Supported by STLC Next. Commissioned by TO Live for the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts Redevelopment Project. Completed in 2022.

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It’s like a mix between geometric language with different patterns, digital parts with organic parts… something like that. The Edmonton mural, for which Alberta is supposed to serve as the inspiration, should last forever although some colours may fade somewhat from exposure to sunlight.

The Hero

The Hero

‘The Hero’ mural, crafted by the artistic talents of Hardthirteen, Trevor Peters, and Annaliza Toledo, not only ranks as their largest creation but also signifies a monumental achievement for EMF. It is a striking work of art, radiating both immense presence and boundless inspiration.