Untitled

Untitled

The geometric shapes cascading around the figure mimic threads passing through time, crafting the fabric of history. This continuity is central to the mural; the ancestors role in shaping the culture and its future.

Frog

Frog

Artist Jordan Gallie hails from the Tsleil-Waututh nation, one of three nations whose ancestral and unceded land includes what is known today as Vancouver and the surrounding inlets, forests, and mountains.

Mending

Mending

Winner of Mural of the Year 2016, this mural depicts a woman mending a ripped heart with thread. It represents the unity of First Nations peoples, from the South to the North. The muskox on her hat relate to how these animals protect their young from predators. The vamps on her poncho are symbols for the missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada, and it highlights the severity of this issue in this particular area of Winnipeg. The act of heart mending occurs every day, in various ways whether it be physical or spiritual, we are all on a process of healing.

Three Wolves

Three Wolves

Cunningham is a Portland-based artist whose work has been exhibited internationally for the last 20 years. His art deals with themes of environmental degradation, skateboard culture, gentrification, contemporary Indigenous identity and rights. Mostly working with large format murals, Cunningham also uses film and sculpture as mediums, drawing inspiration from his cultural background as a member of the Colville Tribe.

The Matriarch

The Matriarch

Artist Siobhan Joseph from the Squamish Nation was inspired by her late mother, the matriarch of her family, who was outspoken, who protested, and loved children. Joseph had a vision of a woman standing in a welcoming pose, with a man and elder woman on either side representing the men and elders of her community supporting her. The matriarch is depicted wearing red to honour the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) and situated in the natural landscape of the land, mountains and sea, to represent connectedness.

Between Two Islands

Between Two Islands

A partnership between the Vancouver Mural Festival, Nicola Wealth Real Estate, and The Narrow Group to transform an iconic Vancouver motel into a temporary art space, landmark, and community event venue before the site is redeveloped. Three artists with different styles collaborated to transform the motel into a single mural stretching across the exterior of the building which now houses artist studios.

Eagle Opens Up

Eagle Opens Up

The content’s positive/impactful in a way it isn’t direct. Art is healing through form/flow/colour/aesthetic all subjective to the artist. Im going to leave perspective on current multi-generational reality that impact communities and people worldwide. It’s bright side as strong as I can express it through my style and spirit: through the art of our culture. Homes, (healthy functioning homes) are safe, sober, clean, strong and productive…loyal, nurturing and unified, (like this design.) A lot of people lost that from their lives. The house design-split-eagle-box represents everything negative and positive, balancing negative/positive spaces and opening up with the guidance of eagle reveals the movement of spirit bringing healing and nourishment to soul.

Our Stories

Our Stories

19 Indigenous artists between the ages of 9-55 created 19 murals in a series titled “Our Stories.” Positioned on the exterior wall of Scotia Square, each mural is unique and tells its own story. These murals were created over the span of five workshops.

Tipi Silhouette

Tipi Silhouette

This mural was a part of Astum Api Niikinaahk, an Indigenous-led housing project at Circle of Life Thunderbird House, the goal of the project to end and bring attention to homelessness. Five Indigenous artists were invited to create public art for the new housing site.

The Death Paintings

The Death Paintings

This mural was a part of Astum Api Niikinaahk, an Indigenous-led housing project at Circle of Life Thunderbird House, the goal of the project to end and bring attention to homelessness. Five Indigenous artists were invited to create public art for the new housing site.

Bear

Bear

This mural was a part of Astum Api Niikinaahk, an Indigenous-led housing project at Circle of Life Thunderbird House, the goal of the project to end and bring attention to homelessness. Five Indigenous artists were invited to create public art for the new housing site.

Debewewin – Truth Rising

Debewewin – Truth Rising

Located on the Main Street Project building, this mural was painted in recognition of the first National Truth & Reconnciliation Day. Bright orange ribbons stretch across this mural honouring those we lost, and eagle figures represent the act of taking their spirits to peace. The turtle (miskwaadesi) is seen in between the ribbons represents the bringing of truth. To the left of the scene is a mother and child, highlighting the importance of a mothers’ protection, prayers and leadership for our children. The white outline represent the guidance of The Great Spirit. This mural acts as a reminder for us to recognize the tragedy of residential schools, missing children, survivors and the families affected.

Nanakchiischinam

Nanakchiischinam

This mural is located on the Main Street Project Emergency Shelter, painted by artists Peatr Thomas and Muuke Valcourt. The colous used within the syllabics of the mural were swatched from the colours of the ProtectOur PeopleMB campaign. This campaign’s goal was to provide vaccines for First Nations communities across the province. The syllabics read “”Nanakchiishinam (na-na-ka-chii-shi-nam), meaning “”Protect Us/People”” in Anishinaabewomin, the language of the Anishinaabe people.

Black Snake Defeated / ᑲᐢᑭᑌ ᑭᓀᐱᐠ ᒥᓯᓂᐦᐋᐤ

Black Snake Defeated / ᑲᐢᑭᑌ ᑭᓀᐱᐠ ᒥᓯᓂᐦᐋᐤ

This painting is called ‘black snake defeated’ and depicts the fields of war I stood on in 2016, when pipeline security deployed attack dogs on peaceful Indigenous water protectors at Oceti Sakowin in the early days of Standing Rock. The painting represents the full story arc of how colonization has turned us against each other: the figures holding the dogs, and those being attacked by them, are one and the same.

KAYAK Mural

KAYAK Mural

This mural was part of a project by Creative Retirement, the making of “The Labyrinth of Lifelong Learning,” a mural also at this location. KAYAK is short for Kommunity and Youth Art Konsortium, which consisted of students from Mulvey school, Wolseley Family Place and from Art City, all who helped create this piece. The mural represents indigenous values and the medicine wheel. One panel reads; “All Nations Hold These Teachings.” Different coloured hands hold animals which represent different teachings. The last two panels show a heart and a sun. The heart consists of many faces within it, showing that love paves the path for all our relations. The sun is the provider of light and energy, and is filled with flowers which symbolize this life.

Sweet Grass – Wiingash

Sweet Grass – Wiingash

Sweet grass is a gift from Mother Earth. It is said to be part of her hair and the use of sweet grass promotes strength and kindness. When braiding sweet grass each strand of the braid represents mind, body and spirit. It is also important to remember the teaching of the sweet grass braid and walk that way when wearing a braid in our own hair. Smudging: The aroma of burning sweet grass has a calming effect and thus promotes kind thoughts. When smudging with sweet grass it is important to honour the hair of mother earth by smudging our own hair with the smoke. Prayer and Ceremony: Since sweet grass promotes strength and kindness it is often used in healing circles and during ceremony to allow positive energy, kind thoughts and kind feelings to surface through any pain and suffering.

Wind of the Supernatural

Wind of the Supernatural

Bubzee and Sage Nowak work together to combine the ancient art of the Pacific Northwest coast First Nations and settler pagan mysticism. Sage’s traditional art is glimpse into the supernatural world making visions tangible. Bubzee is a powerful wind; from the howl a whisper tells old stories that bring you to the roots of magic in nature. Their works weave together two cultures creating a powerful tapestry of reclamation. Their work is political, environmental, and spiritual. Their art creates awareness and touches on topics such as missing and murdered indigenous woman, fish farms, land and water defense, and indigenous/human rights issues in a variety of mediums including sculpture, painting, printing, beading, fashion, design, and performance. They are both professional independent artist that have been collaborating over the past five years and will continue into the future.

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The mural represents the “Indigenous significance of the Inglewood area where the Bow and Elbow rivers meet, recognizing past and present, the existing vibrant community and a connected future through stewardship of the land.”